Current Projects

Hamstring Vibration-Augmented Quadriceps Training: A Strategy to Restore Quadriceps Performance and Promote Joint Health Following ACL Reconstruction

Persistent quadriceps weakness and hamstring over-excitation are common following ACL reconstruction. This results in altered gait biomechanics, which can lead to post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of acute hamstring vibration and vibration-augmented quadriceps training on quadriceps performance and knee function. The results of this study will help us to develop rehabilitation strategies to reduce reinjury and prevent development of knee osteoarthritis. (See flyer.)  

If you would like to participate in this study, please contact Tim Lowe at t.lowe@utexas.edu

Neuromuscular Control Pattern in Rotator Cuff Disease

Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal clinical conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare muscle activity patterns and fatigability of rotator cuff and deltoid muscles between individuals with and without rotator cuff disease. We will determine differences in the neuromuscular control patterns of the rotator cuff and deltoid muscles during various force levels and fatigue. The result of this study will contribute to developing mechanism-based treatment strategies for rotator cuff disease. (See flyer.)

If you would like to participate in this study, please contact Xin Yu at xin.sienna.yu@utexas.edu.

Neuromuscular Control Patterns in Rotator Cuff Disease in Aged Adults

Identifiable shoulder disorders are very common in elderly adults. The aim of this study is to investigate neuromuscular control patterns of the rotator cuff and deltoid muscles in elderly adults aged over 65 years with and without shoulder pain. We will investigate differences during various force levels and fatigue tasks. The results of this study will contribute to developing mechanism-based treatment strategies for rotator cuff disease in the elderly. (See flyer.)

If you would like to participate in this study, please contact Huiying Zhu at zhu00155@utexas.edu.

Balance Control in Older Adults with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a common condition in the diabetes population affecting the lower leg and foot. This results in poor balance control leading to increased fall risk. We aim to identify the biomechanical and neuromuscular control mechanisms affected by peripheral neuropathy. Results of this study will help us develop treatment strategies to improve balance and decrease the risk of falling and consequently enhance the quality of life and life expectancy in old adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. (See flyer.) 

If you would like to participate in this study, please contact Mohsen Alighanbari at m.alighanbari@utexas.edu.